HEALTHY LIVING TIPS FOR TEENAGERS

The teenage years are a period of growth and transition that can present unique challenges. Automobile accidents, sexually transmitted disease and substance abuse are among the many health and safety issues facing teens. Fortunately, you can reduce the risk of unnecessary harm by making healthy lifestyle choices.

Eat Right

Food provides the nutrients needed for growth, energy production and other bodily processes. Proper nutrition is especially important during your teen years when your mind and body are developing rapidly. Teens should eat a variety of foods like fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains and lean protein while reserving sweets and high-fat foods for occasional treats. Daily multivitamin supplements — not a substitute for healthy eating — can help you meet your nutritional requirements when added to a well-balanced diet.

Exercise

Exercise is essential for weight management, physical fitness and overall health. While fine in moderation, sedentary activities like watching TV and playing video games contribute to obesity when they take the place of more active hobbies. A combination of cardiovascular, strength training and flexibility exercises is required for optimal fitness. Aim for at least 60 minutes of aerobic exercise each day. Choose activities you enjoy, such as mountain biking or team sports, to make exercise a pleasure instead of a chore and to increase the likelihood that you’ll keep exercising.

Safety

Today’s teen faces many potential safety risks. Accidents, sexually transmitted disease and unwanted pregnancy are a few of the potential pitfalls during your teen years. Avoiding drug and alcohol use is a good way to reduce these risks. Teenagers who drink alcohol are more likely make poor choices like having unprotected sex or driving drunk. Healthy extracurricular activities like sports and youth groups allows you to have fun without drugs and alcohol.

Sleep

Sleep is vital for your physical, mental and emotional health. Inadequate sleep can interfere with your academic performance and increase your risk of automobile accidents and other types of injury. The National Sleep Foundation recommends that teens aim for 8.5 to 9 hours of sleep each night. Adhering to a regular sleep schedule and making time for relaxing activities before bed can help improve your sleep quality.

Get Your Teen Screened for Depression


The Basics


If your teen is between ages 12 and 18, talk to a doctor about screening (testing) for depression. More than 1 in 10 teens have some signs of depression.


Depression is serious, but it can be treated with medicine and counseling. Most teens with depression don’t get the help they need.


Talk to your teen’s doctor about screening for depression, even if you don’t see signs of a problem. Find out what services are available (such as therapy or counseling), in case your teen needs follow-up care.


What happens during a depression screening?

The doctor will ask your teen questions about her feelings and behaviors. The doctor may ask her how often she:


Feels hopeless or sad

Has low energy or feels tired all day

Has trouble paying attention at school

Eats too much or not enough

Screening for depression usually takes about 5 minutes. It can be done as part of your teen’s yearly checkup.


What is depression?


Teen depression is a serious mental health problem. If your child is depressed, he may:


Feel sad most of the time

Lose interest in favorite activities

Have aches and pains for no reason

Sleep too much or be unable to sleep

Eat too much or not enough

Use drugs or alcohol

Think about death or suicide

It’s normal for teens to have mood swings. It can be hard to tell if your child is just feeling down or if he is depressed. This is why it’s so important to have your teen screened for depression.


Learn more about depression in teens:


Depression: A Fact Sheet for Parents [PDF - 123 KB] 



What causes depression?


Depression can happen to anyone. It’s not your fault or your teen’s fault. Some experiences may make it more likely that a teen will develop depression, like:


Dealing with a big loss, like a death or divorce in the family

Living with someone who is depressed

Having another mental health problem, like anxiety or an eating disorder

Feeling stressed at school or at home

Having a family history of depression

Teen girls are more likely to get depressed than teen boys.


What if the doctor finds signs of depression?

If your child is showing signs of depression, the doctor will:


Refer your teen to a therapist or doctor with special training in helping young people with emotional and behavioral problems

Order blood tests to check for other health problems

Be sure to include your teen when making decisions about treatment.


Take Action!

Protect your teen’s mental health. Talk to your teen and your teen’s doctor about depression.


Talk to your teen’s doctor about depression screening.

Ask the doctor to screen your child for depression. If you are worried about your teen, tell the doctor. Find out what services are available in case your teen needs treatment.


What about cost?

Screening for depression is covered under the new Affordable Care Act  Depending on your insurance plan, your teen may be able to get screened at no cost to you. Check with your insurance provider.


Even if you don’t have health insurance, free and low-cost mental health services are available. Find mental health services near you (http://store.samhsa.gov/mhlocator).


Write down any concerns you have.

Keep track of your teen’s actions and words that make you think she might be depressed. If you see a change in your child’s behavior, make a note about the change and when it happened. Include details like:


How long the behavior has been going on

How often the behavior happens

How serious you think it is

You can share these notes with your teen’s doctor. You can also use them to start a conversation with your teen.


Watch for signs that your teen may be thinking about suicide.

Most people who are depressed don’t attempt suicide, but depression can increase the risk of suicide and suicide attempts. Suicide is the third leading cause of death for people ages 15 to 24.


These behaviors may be signs your teen is thinking about suicide:


Threatening to kill or hurt himself

Taking dangerous risks like driving recklessly

Spending less and less time with friends and family

If your child is showing some or all of these warning signs, get help right away.


For information about how to help a loved one, visit the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline   or call 1-800-273-TALK (1-800-273-8255).

If someone is in immediate danger, call 911.

Find resources for your teen. 

If your teen isn’t ready to talk to you about her feelings, there are still things you can do. Help your child find resources online and in the community that are just for her.


Depression Information for Teens 


For girls: How to know if your “blues” are depression  

Make a list with your teen of other people she can go to with problems or questions, like a teacher, guidance counselor, or adult friend. Point out ways she can get information anonymously (without giving her name).


Remind your teen that you are there if she wants to talk.




Healthy Eating Habits for Your Child

By teaching your children healthy eating habits, you can keep them at a healthy weight. Also, the eating habits your children pick up when they are young will help them maintain a healthy lifestyle when they are adults.
One of the most important approaches to eating is cutting down on fat intake. Simple ways to accomplish this include eating low-fat or nonfat dairy products, poultry without skin, lean meats, and low-fat or fat-free breads and cereals.



Child Discipline Tactics

Discipline is the process of teaching your child what type of behavior is acceptable and what type is not acceptable. In other words, discipline teaches a child to follow rules. Discipline may involve both punishment, such as a time out, and, more importantly, rewards. It sounds so straightforward, yet every parent becomes frustrated at one time or another with issues surrounding children and discipline.




If you are unsure about how to select and prepare a variety of foods for your family, consult a doctor or registered dietitian for nutrition counseling.
It is important that you do not place youroverweight child(ren) on a restrictive diet. Children should never be placed on a restrictive diet to lose weight unless a doctor supervises one for medical reasons.
Other approaches parents can take to develop healthy eating habits in their children include:
Guide your family’s choices rather than dictate foods. Make a wide variety of healthful foods available in the house. This practice will help your children learn how to make healthy food choices.
Encourage your children to eat slowly. A child can detect hunger and fullness better when eating slowly.
Eat meals together as a family as often as possible. Try to make mealtimes pleasant with conversation and sharing, not a time for scolding or arguing. If mealtimes are unpleasant, children may try to eat faster to leave the table as soon as possible. They then may learn to associate eating with stress.
Involve your children in food shopping and preparing meals. These activities will give you hints about your children’s food preferences, an opportunity to teach your children about nutrition, and provide your kids with a feeling of accomplishment. In addition, children may be more willing to eat or try foods that they help prepare.
Plan for snacks. Continuous snacking may lead to overeating, but snacks that are planned at specific times during the day can be part of a nutritious diet, without spoiling a child’s appetite at meal times. You should make snacks as nutritious as possible, without depriving your children of occasional chips or cookies, especially at parties or other social events.
Discourage eating meals or snacks while watching TV. Try to eat only in designated areas of your home, such as the dining room or kitchen. Eating in front of the TV may make it difficult to pay attention to feelings of fullness, and may lead to overeating.
Encourage your children to choose water as their beverage. Over consumption of sweetened drinks and sodas has been linked to increased rates of obesity in children.
Try not to use food to punish or reward your children. Withholding food as a punishment may lead children to worry that they will not get enough food. For example, sending children to bed without any dinner may cause them to worry that they will go hungry. As a result, children may try to eat whenever they get a chance. Similarly, when foods, such as sweets, are used as a reward, children may assume that these foods are better or more valuable than other foods. For example, telling children that they will get dessert if they eat all of their vegetables sends the wrong message about vegetables.
Make sure your children’s meals outside the home are balanced. Find out more about their school lunch program, or pack their lunch to include a variety of foods. Also, select healthier items when dining at restaurants.

Healthy Eating Habits for Your Child

By teaching your children healthy eating habits, you can keep them at a healthy weight. Also, the eating habits your children pick up when they are young will help them maintain a healthy lifestyle when they are adults.

One of the most important approaches to eating is cutting down on fat intake. Simple ways to accomplish this include eating low-fat or nonfat dairy products, poultry without skin, lean meats, and low-fat or fat-free breads and cereals.

Child Discipline Tactics

Discipline is the process of teaching your child what type of behavior is acceptable and what type is not acceptable. In other words, discipline teaches a child to follow rules. Discipline may involve both punishment, such as a time out, and, more importantly, rewards. It sounds so straightforward, yet every parent becomes frustrated at one time or another with issues surrounding children and discipline.

If you are unsure about how to select and prepare a variety of foods for your family, consult a doctor or registered dietitian for nutrition counseling.

It is important that you do not place youroverweight child(ren) on a restrictive diet. Children should never be placed on a restrictive diet to lose weight unless a doctor supervises one for medical reasons.

Other approaches parents can take to develop healthy eating habits in their children include:

  • Guide your family’s choices rather than dictate foods. Make a wide variety of healthful foods available in the house. This practice will help your children learn how to make healthy food choices.
  • Encourage your children to eat slowly. A child can detect hunger and fullness better when eating slowly.
  • Eat meals together as a family as often as possible. Try to make mealtimes pleasant with conversation and sharing, not a time for scolding or arguing. If mealtimes are unpleasant, children may try to eat faster to leave the table as soon as possible. They then may learn to associate eating with stress.
  • Involve your children in food shopping and preparing meals. These activities will give you hints about your children’s food preferences, an opportunity to teach your children about nutrition, and provide your kids with a feeling of accomplishment. In addition, children may be more willing to eat or try foods that they help prepare.
  • Plan for snacks. Continuous snacking may lead to overeating, but snacks that are planned at specific times during the day can be part of a nutritious diet, without spoiling a child’s appetite at meal times. You should make snacks as nutritious as possible, without depriving your children of occasional chips or cookies, especially at parties or other social events.
  • Discourage eating meals or snacks while watching TV. Try to eat only in designated areas of your home, such as the dining room or kitchen. Eating in front of the TV may make it difficult to pay attention to feelings of fullness, and may lead to overeating.
  • Encourage your children to choose water as their beverage. Over consumption of sweetened drinks and sodas has been linked to increased rates of obesity in children.
  • Try not to use food to punish or reward your children. Withholding food as a punishment may lead children to worry that they will not get enough food. For example, sending children to bed without any dinner may cause them to worry that they will go hungry. As a result, children may try to eat whenever they get a chance. Similarly, when foods, such as sweets, are used as a reward, children may assume that these foods are better or more valuable than other foods. For example, telling children that they will get dessert if they eat all of their vegetables sends the wrong message about vegetables.
  • Make sure your children’s meals outside the home are balanced. Find out more about their school lunch program, or pack their lunch to include a variety of foods. Also, select healthier items when dining at restaurants.

Senior Healthy Living — A Guide to Living a Healthy Lifestyle
Healthy Living for Seniors: An Overview
Getting older is inevitable. And there is a lot of company. In fact, within 25 years, almost one in five Americans will fall into the “older” category. With an increasingly older population, the number of people suffering from chronic diseases, disability, and death are rising.
 
Just because your age is increasing, however, this does not mean that you need to give in to the effects of age or to these conditions. Poor health is not a consequence of age. To a large extent, the major chronic disease killers — heart disease, cancer, stroke, and diabetes — are an extension of what people do, or not do, as they go about their daily lives. You can choose to do things in your daily life to live healthier and decrease the chances of developing these conditions.
 
Living healthy begins with education, and we don’t mean schooling. We mean education about these conditions that can have a negative impact on your quality of life or lifespan. For example, everyone should be knowledgeable about heart disease risk factors because heart disease is the number one killer of both men and women. Understanding the common cancers (including breast cancer, cervical cancer,prostate cancer, and colon cancer) and screening for them is also important.
 
Healthy living also involves practicing a healthy lifestyle. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), nearly 40 percent of deaths in America are related to smoking, physical inactivity, poor diet, or alcohol misuse. You can begin (or continue) living a healthy lifestyle by:
 
Watching your weight
Eating healthy
Staying physically active
Quitting smoking (if you smoke)
Preventing injury.
 

By adopting these behaviors, you may be able to control or prevent many of the problems that occur as people age.




Healthy Living: Watching Your Weight, Eating Right, and Staying Active

Being overweight increases your risk for heart disease, diabetes, and high blood pressure (known medically ashypertension).
 
(Click BMI Calculator to find your ideal weight.)
 
To stay at a healthy weight, you need to balance the number of calories you eat with the number you burn off by your activities. You can get to your healthy weight and stay there by doing two things:
 
Eating right
Keeping active.
 

Eating Right
Eating the right foods and the right amounts can help you live a longer, healthier life. Many illnesses and conditions — such as heart disease, obesity, high blood pressure, and type 2 diabetes — can be prevented or controlled by eating right. A healthy diet also provides the vitamins and minerals you need. It is never too late to start eating right. Here are some helpful tips.
 
Eat a variety of heart-healthy foods, including:
 
Vegetables, especially dark-green leafy and deep-yellow vegetables, such as spinach or carrots, and legumes, such as lima beans or green peas
Fruits, such as melons, berries, and citrus fruits, or juices, such as orange or grapefruit
Meat, poultry, eggs, fish, and dried beans (for example, navy, kidney, or black), especially products low in fat, such as lean meat and poultry prepared without skin
Dairy products, such as milk, yogurt, and cheese, especially low-fat or fat-free dairy products
Grains, especially whole grains, such as oatmeal or whole-grain breads.

 
Limit calories and saturated fat. Foods high in saturated fat are high in calories, so they can cause weight gain. They also increase your cholesterol levels. Try to limit your consumption of the following:
 
High-fat dairy products, such as ice cream, butter, cheese, cream, and whole milk
Meats high in fat, such as bacon or chicken with the skin on
Palm and coconut oils and lard.

 
Unsaturated fats do not raise cholesterol levels. Foods with unsaturated fat include vegetable oils, fish, avocados, and many nuts.
 

Watch portion sizes.
 

Don’t choose “super” or other oversized portions.
 

Be aware of how much you eat.
 

Keeping Active
There are many benefits to staying active. Physical activity can help prevent:
 
Heart disease
Obesity
High blood pressure (hypertension)
Type 2 diabetes
Osteoporosis (thinning bones)
Mental health problems, such as depression.
 

Physical activity also helps you stay at a healthy weight, reduce stress, sleep better, and feel better overall.
 
All kinds of physical activity, whether it is moderate or vigorous, will help you stay healthy. It’s a good idea to aim for at least moderate activity — such as brisk walking, raking leaves, or house cleaning — for 30 minutes most days of the week. Generally, the more active you are, the healthier you will become.
 
If you have not been active, start slowly. Choose something that fits into your daily life. Suggestions include the following:
 
Choose an activity you like, or try a new one. Activities such as dancing, swimming, or biking can be fun.
Ask a friend to exercise with you, or join a group.
Make time in your day for physical activity.
If the weather is bad, try an exercise show on TV, watch an exercise tape, walk in the mall, or work around the house.






Healthy Living: Quitting Smoking

Tobacco use is the single most preventable cause of death and disease in the United States. More than 430,000 Americans die each year from smoking. Smoking causes illnesses such as cancer, heart and lung disease, and stroke.
 
When you quit, you lower your chances of getting sick from smoking. Quitting is hard. Most people try several times before they quit for good.
 
When you are getting ready to quit:
 
Make a plan and set a quit date.
Tell your healthcare provider that you want to quit smoking, and get medicine to help you quit.
Tell your family, friends, and people you work with that you are going to quit. Ask for their support.
 

When you quit:
 
Get support and encouragement. You may want to join a quit-smoking program.
If you slip and smoke, don’t give up. Set a new date to get back on track.
After you quit, don’t smoke — not even a puff. Try to keep yourself away from all cigarettes.
 


Healthy Living: Preventing Injury

Following basic safety rules can prevent many serious injuries. Here are two checklists to follow to help keep you and your family safe.
 
To help protect yourself at home:
 
Use smoke detectors. Remember to check the batteries every month. Change the batteries every year. You may want to use a reminder. For example, change the batteries around your birthday or some holiday.
 

Lock up guns and ammunition, and store them separately.
 

Keep hallways and stairwells well lit.
 

Remove or repair things that someone could trip on, such as loose rugs, electrical cords, and toys.
 

To help protect yourself away from home:
 
Wear seat belts.
Never drive after drinking alcohol.
Always wear a safety helmet while riding a motorcycle or bicycle.
Be alert for hazards in your workplace. Follow workplace safety rules.

Senior Healthy Living — A Guide to Living a Healthy Lifestyle

Healthy Living for Seniors: An Overview

Getting older is inevitable. And there is a lot of company. In fact, within 25 years, almost one in five Americans will fall into the “older” category. With an increasingly older population, the number of people suffering from chronic diseases, disability, and death are rising.

 
Just because your age is increasing, however, this does not mean that you need to give in to the effects of age or to these conditions. Poor health is not a consequence of age. To a large extent, the major chronic disease killers — heart disease, cancer, stroke, and diabetes — are an extension of what people do, or not do, as they go about their daily lives. You can choose to do things in your daily life to live healthier and decrease the chances of developing these conditions.
 
Living healthy begins with education, and we don’t mean schooling. We mean education about these conditions that can have a negative impact on your quality of life or lifespan. For example, everyone should be knowledgeable about heart disease risk factors because heart disease is the number one killer of both men and women. Understanding the common cancers (including breast cancercervical cancer,prostate cancer, and colon cancer) and screening for them is also important.
 
Healthy living also involves practicing a healthy lifestyle. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), nearly 40 percent of deaths in America are related to smoking, physical inactivity, poor diet, or alcohol misuse. You can begin (or continue) living a healthy lifestyle by:
 
  • Watching your weight
  • Eating healthy
  • Staying physically active
  • Quitting smoking (if you smoke)
  • Preventing injury.
     
By adopting these behaviors, you may be able to control or prevent many of the problems that occur as people age.

Healthy Living: Watching Your Weight, Eating Right, and Staying Active

Being overweight increases your risk for heart diseasediabetes, and high blood pressure (known medically ashypertension).
 
(Click BMI Calculator to find your ideal weight.)
 
To stay at a healthy weight, you need to balance the number of calories you eat with the number you burn off by your activities. You can get to your healthy weight and stay there by doing two things:
 
  • Eating right
  • Keeping active.
     
Eating Right
Eating the right foods and the right amounts can help you live a longer, healthier life. Many illnesses and conditions — such as heart disease, obesity, high blood pressure, and type 2 diabetes — can be prevented or controlled by eating right. A healthy diet also provides the vitamins and minerals you need. It is never too late to start eating right. Here are some helpful tips.
 
  • Eat a variety of heart-healthy foods, including:
     
    • Vegetables, especially dark-green leafy and deep-yellow vegetables, such as spinach or carrots, and legumes, such as lima beans or green peas
    • Fruits, such as melons, berries, and citrus fruits, or juices, such as orange or grapefruit
    • Meat, poultry, eggs, fish, and dried beans (for example, navy, kidney, or black), especially products low in fat, such as lean meat and poultry prepared without skin
    • Dairy products, such as milk, yogurt, and cheese, especially low-fat or fat-free dairy products
    • Grains, especially whole grains, such as oatmeal or whole-grain breads.
 
  • Limit calories and saturated fat. Foods high in saturated fat are high in calories, so they can cause weight gain. They also increase your cholesterol levels. Try to limit your consumption of the following:
     
    • High-fat dairy products, such as ice cream, butter, cheese, cream, and whole milk
    • Meats high in fat, such as bacon or chicken with the skin on
    • Palm and coconut oils and lard.
 
  • Unsaturated fats do not raise cholesterol levels. Foods with unsaturated fat include vegetable oils, fish, avocados, and many nuts.
     
  • Watch portion sizes.
     
  • Don’t choose “super” or other oversized portions.
     
  • Be aware of how much you eat.
     
Keeping Active
There are many benefits to staying active. Physical activity can help prevent:
 
  • Heart disease
  • Obesity
  • High blood pressure (hypertension)
  • Type 2 diabetes
  • Osteoporosis (thinning bones)
  • Mental health problems, such as depression.
     
Physical activity also helps you stay at a healthy weight, reduce stress, sleep better, and feel better overall.
 
All kinds of physical activity, whether it is moderate or vigorous, will help you stay healthy. It’s a good idea to aim for at least moderate activity — such as brisk walking, raking leaves, or house cleaning — for 30 minutes most days of the week. Generally, the more active you are, the healthier you will become.
 
If you have not been active, start slowly. Choose something that fits into your daily life. Suggestions include the following:
 
  • Choose an activity you like, or try a new one. Activities such as dancing, swimming, or biking can be fun.
  • Ask a friend to exercise with you, or join a group.
  • Make time in your day for physical activity.
  • If the weather is bad, try an exercise show on TV, watch an exercise tape, walk in the mall, or work around the house.

Healthy Living: Quitting Smoking

Tobacco use is the single most preventable cause of death and disease in the United States. More than 430,000 Americans die each year from smoking. Smoking causes illnesses such as cancer, heart and lung disease, and stroke.
 
When you quit, you lower your chances of getting sick from smoking. Quitting is hard. Most people try several times before they quit for good.
 
When you are getting ready to quit:
 
  • Make a plan and set a quit date.
  • Tell your healthcare provider that you want to quit smoking, and get medicine to help you quit.
  • Tell your family, friends, and people you work with that you are going to quit. Ask for their support.
     
When you quit:
 
  • Get support and encouragement. You may want to join a quit-smoking program.
  • If you slip and smoke, don’t give up. Set a new date to get back on track.
  • After you quit, don’t smoke — not even a puff. Try to keep yourself away from all cigarettes.
     

Healthy Living: Preventing Injury

Following basic safety rules can prevent many serious injuries. Here are two checklists to follow to help keep you and your family safe.
 
To help protect yourself at home:
 
  • Use smoke detectors. Remember to check the batteries every month. Change the batteries every year. You may want to use a reminder. For example, change the batteries around your birthday or some holiday.
     
  • Lock up guns and ammunition, and store them separately.
     
  • Keep hallways and stairwells well lit.
     
  • Remove or repair things that someone could trip on, such as loose rugs, electrical cords, and toys.
     
To help protect yourself away from home:
 
  • Wear seat belts.
  • Never drive after drinking alcohol.
  • Always wear a safety helmet while riding a motorcycle or bicycle.
  • Be alert for hazards in your workplace. Follow workplace safety rules.

A GUIDE TO LIVING A HEALTHY LIFE STYLE
What does it mean to live a healthy lifestyle? It is a way of living that allows you to enjoy more aspects of your life in a more fulfilling way. It is not just about trying to avoid one illness after another, or trying to just not feel as bad as you normally do. It is about feeling and being well physically, mentally and socially. It is about making specific choices that give you the opportunity to feel your best for as long as you can. Living a healthy lifestyle is about saying YES to life.
Three Essential Ways to Live Healthy
Do you want to have a body that can support you well into your old age? Do you wish to have mental clarity, quality relationships, good working internal functions, or even an overall feeling of well being? Well, living a healthy lifestyle is what can get you there, or at least improve your condition. There are three specific things that you should do:
 1. Exercise
You shouldn’t be surprised that this one is on the list. It is unavoidable. Physical activity is essential to healthy living. The body was meant to move, and when it does not, it can become unhappy and ill. Physical activity stimulates the body’s natural maintenance and repair systems that keep it going. It improves circulation to our heart and lungs. It gives us strength to stave off injuries, and it increases the mobility in our muscles and joints. Physical activity also releases endorphins; the feel good hormones that create a sense of general well being. Physical activity is good for the body and the mind.
Exercises include brisk walking, cycling, dancing, swimming, rowing, elliptical workouts and jogging. Yoga, and pilates are also good exercise workouts; however, they should be performed in conjunction with the cardiovascular-type workouts mentioned above.
2. Eating healthy
Have you ever heard of the saying “you are what you eat” or “garbage in garbage out”? Well, it is true. What you put into your body directly affects how you feel physically, your mood, your mental clarity, your internal workings, and even your skin. Eating healthy does not mean eating expensive foods with little taste. As a matter of fact, there are some fantastic health recipes online and in cookbooks that are very healthy. Basically, you want to aim for a diet that is low in salt, fat and unprocessed foods and is high in fruits, vegetables, whole grains and omega-3 fatty acids. It is also good to take a multi vitamin to ensure you are meeting your nutrient requirements.
3. Reduce stress
We have got to get rid of all of this stress. Stress happens when your life becomes out of balance physically, mentally or emotionally. This imbalance can be caused by internal stress like worrying too much, environmental stress like pressure from work, family or friends, or by stress from being fatigued or overworked. Being stressed out has the potential to affect your health in a variety of ways. You can become tired, sick, tense, irritable, and unable to think clearly. If you want to live a healthy lifestyle, you will need to manage the stress in your life so that it does not overtake you. This means taking charge of your thoughts, emotions, tasks, and environment to get your body back in balance.
Action Items
Here are some specific action items for living a healthy lifestyle:
Use the food pyramid as a guide to how much of what to eat
Eat less processed foods
Reduce your sugar intake
Grill, boil, or bake foods rather than frying them
Reduce the amount of meat you eat
Eat a lot of fresh locally produced vegetables and fruits
Avoid adding salt to your meals after they have been cooked
Regulate your portion sizes (a portion is about the size of your fist)
Reduce your alcohol consumption
Reduce caffeine consumption
Don’t eat foods that have a lifetime warranty (unless we have some sort of disaster and you have been storing them in your basement for just that case)
Stop smoking
Laugh a lot
Exercise at a moderate intensity, for at least a half an hour three to five times per week.
Find ways to eliminate stress (meditate, exercise, guided imagery, music)
Give to others with no strings attached
Smile at strangers
Learn to say no
Avoid people who put their stress on you
Take control of your life
Always say please and thank you

A GUIDE TO LIVING A HEALTHY LIFE STYLE

What does it mean to live a healthy lifestyle? It is a way of living that allows you to enjoy more aspects of your life in a more fulfilling way. It is not just about trying to avoid one illness after another, or trying to just not feel as bad as you normally do. It is about feeling and being well physically, mentally and socially. It is about making specific choices that give you the opportunity to feel your best for as long as you can. Living a healthy lifestyle is about saying YES to life.

Three Essential Ways to Live Healthy

Do you want to have a body that can support you well into your old age? Do you wish to have mental clarity, quality relationships, good working internal functions, or even an overall feeling of well being? Well, living a healthy lifestyle is what can get you there, or at least improve your condition. There are three specific things that you should do:

 1. Exercise

You shouldn’t be surprised that this one is on the list. It is unavoidable. Physical activity is essential to healthy living. The body was meant to move, and when it does not, it can become unhappy and ill. Physical activity stimulates the body’s natural maintenance and repair systems that keep it going. It improves circulation to our heart and lungs. It gives us strength to stave off injuries, and it increases the mobility in our muscles and joints. Physical activity also releases endorphins; the feel good hormones that create a sense of general well being. Physical activity is good for the body and the mind.

Exercises include brisk walking, cycling, dancing, swimming, rowing, elliptical workouts and jogging. Yoga, and pilates are also good exercise workouts; however, they should be performed in conjunction with the cardiovascular-type workouts mentioned above.

2. Eating healthy

Have you ever heard of the saying “you are what you eat” or “garbage in garbage out”? Well, it is true. What you put into your body directly affects how you feel physically, your mood, your mental clarity, your internal workings, and even your skin. Eating healthy does not mean eating expensive foods with little taste. As a matter of fact, there are some fantastic health recipes online and in cookbooks that are very healthy. Basically, you want to aim for a diet that is low in salt, fat and unprocessed foods and is high in fruits, vegetables, whole grains and omega-3 fatty acids. It is also good to take a multi vitamin to ensure you are meeting your nutrient requirements.

3. Reduce stress

We have got to get rid of all of this stress. Stress happens when your life becomes out of balance physically, mentally or emotionally. This imbalance can be caused by internal stress like worrying too much, environmental stress like pressure from work, family or friends, or by stress from being fatigued or overworked. Being stressed out has the potential to affect your health in a variety of ways. You can become tired, sick, tense, irritable, and unable to think clearly. If you want to live a healthy lifestyle, you will need to manage the stress in your life so that it does not overtake you. This means taking charge of your thoughts, emotions, tasks, and environment to get your body back in balance.

Action Items

Here are some specific action items for living a healthy lifestyle:

  1. Use the food pyramid as a guide to how much of what to eat
  2. Eat less processed foods
  3. Reduce your sugar intake
  4. Grill, boil, or bake foods rather than frying them
  5. Reduce the amount of meat you eat
  6. Eat a lot of fresh locally produced vegetables and fruits
  7. Avoid adding salt to your meals after they have been cooked
  8. Regulate your portion sizes (a portion is about the size of your fist)
  9. Reduce your alcohol consumption
  10. Reduce caffeine consumption
  11. Don’t eat foods that have a lifetime warranty (unless we have some sort of disaster and you have been storing them in your basement for just that case)
  12. Stop smoking
  13. Laugh a lot
  14. Exercise at a moderate intensity, for at least a half an hour three to five times per week.
  15. Find ways to eliminate stress (meditate, exercise, guided imagery, music)
  16. Give to others with no strings attached
  17. Smile at strangers
  18. Learn to say no
  19. Avoid people who put their stress on you
  20. Take control of your life
  21. Always say please and thank you

 

Simple Ways to Live a Healthy Lifestyle 


You hear a lot about living a healthy lifestyle, but what does that mean? In general, a healthy person doesn’t smoke, is at a healthy weight, eats healthy and exercises. Sounds simple, doesn’t it?
The trick to healthy living is making small changes…taking more steps, adding fruit to your cereal, having an extra glass of water…these are just a few ways you can start living healthy without drastic changes.

Exercise

One of the biggest problems in America today is lack of activity. We know it’s good for us but avoid it like the plague either because we’re used to being sedentary or afraid that exercise has to be vigorous to be worth our time. The truth is, movement is movement and the more you do, the healthier you’ll be. Even moderate activities like chores, gardening and walking can make a difference.

Just adding a little movement to your life can:

Reduce the risk of heart disease, stroke and diabetes
Improve joint stability
Increase and improve range of movement
Help maintain flexibility as you age
Maintain bone mass
Prevent osteoporosis and fractures
Improve mood and reduce symptoms of anxiety and depression
Enhance self esteem
Improve memory in elderly people
Reduce stress
So, even if you opt for small changes and a more modest weight loss, you can see the benefits are still pretty good. One study has found that just a 10% weight reduction helped obese patients reduce blood pressure, cholesterol and increase longevity.

Simple Ways to Move Your Body

You can start the process of weight loss now by adding a little more activity to your life. If you’re not ready for a structured program, start small. Every little bit counts and it all adds up to burning more calories.

Turn off the TV. Once a week, turn off the TV and do something a little more physical with your family. Play games, take a walk…almost anything will be more active than sitting on the couch.
Walk more. Look for small ways to walk more. When you get the mail, take a walk around the block, take the dog for an extra outing each day or walk on your treadmill for 5 minutes before getting ready for work.
Do some chores. Shoveling snow, working in the garden, raking leaves, sweeping the floor…these kinds of activities may not be ‘vigorous’ exercise, but they can keep you moving while getting your house in order.
Pace while you talk. When you’re on the phone, pace around or even do some cleaning while gabbing. This is a great way to stay moving while doing something you enjoy.
Be aware. Make a list of all the physical activities you do on a typical day. If you find that the bulk of your time is spent sitting, make another list of all the ways you could move more—getting up each hour to stretch or walk, walk the stairs at work, etc.
Learn about more ways to fit in exercise.

Eating Well

Eating a healthy diet is another part of the healthy lifestyle. Not only can a clean diet help with weight management, it can also improve your health and quality of life as you get older. You can use the new MyPlate to determine how many calories you need and what food groups you should focus on or, if you’re looking for smaller changes, you can use these tips for simple ways to change how you eat:

Eat more fruit. Add it to your cereal, your salads or even your dinners
Sneak in more veggies. Add them wherever you can—a tomato on your sandwich, peppers on your pizza, or extra veggies in your pasta sauce. Keep pre-cut or canned/frozen veggies ready for quick snacks.
Switch your salad dressing. If you eat full-fat dressing, switch to something lighter and you’ll automatically eat less calories.
Eat low-fat or fat-free dairy. Switching to skim milk or fat free yogurt is another simple way to eat less calories without having to change too much in your diet.
Make some substitutes. Look through your cabinets or fridge and pick 3 foods you eat every day. Write down the nutritional content and, the next time you’re at the store, find lower-calorie substitutes for just those 3 items.
Find more ideas for healthy foods with this Healthy Foods Grocery List.

Creating a healthy lifestyle doesn’t have to mean drastic changes. In fact, drastic changes almost always lead to failure. Making small changes in how you live each day can lead to big rewards, so figure out what you can to be healthy today.

 

Simple Ways to Live a Healthy Lifestyle 

You hear a lot about living a healthy lifestyle, but what does that mean? In general, a healthy person doesn’t smoke, is at a healthy weight, eats healthy and exercises. Sounds simple, doesn’t it?

The trick to healthy living is making small changes…taking more steps, adding fruit to your cereal, having an extra glass of water…these are just a few ways you can start living healthy without drastic changes.

Exercise

One of the biggest problems in America today is lack of activity. We know it’s good for us but avoid it like the plague either because we’re used to being sedentary or afraid that exercise has to be vigorous to be worth our time. The truth is, movement is movement and the more you do, the healthier you’ll be. Even moderate activities like chores, gardening and walking can make a difference.

Just adding a little movement to your life can:

Reduce the risk of heart disease, stroke and diabetes

Improve joint stability

Increase and improve range of movement

Help maintain flexibility as you age

Maintain bone mass

Prevent osteoporosis and fractures

Improve mood and reduce symptoms of anxiety and depression

Enhance self esteem

Improve memory in elderly people

Reduce stress

So, even if you opt for small changes and a more modest weight loss, you can see the benefits are still pretty good. One study has found that just a 10% weight reduction helped obese patients reduce blood pressure, cholesterol and increase longevity.

Simple Ways to Move Your Body

You can start the process of weight loss now by adding a little more activity to your life. If you’re not ready for a structured program, start small. Every little bit counts and it all adds up to burning more calories.

Turn off the TV. Once a week, turn off the TV and do something a little more physical with your family. Play games, take a walk…almost anything will be more active than sitting on the couch.

Walk more. Look for small ways to walk more. When you get the mail, take a walk around the block, take the dog for an extra outing each day or walk on your treadmill for 5 minutes before getting ready for work.

Do some chores. Shoveling snow, working in the garden, raking leaves, sweeping the floor…these kinds of activities may not be ‘vigorous’ exercise, but they can keep you moving while getting your house in order.

Pace while you talk. When you’re on the phone, pace around or even do some cleaning while gabbing. This is a great way to stay moving while doing something you enjoy.

Be aware. Make a list of all the physical activities you do on a typical day. If you find that the bulk of your time is spent sitting, make another list of all the ways you could move more—getting up each hour to stretch or walk, walk the stairs at work, etc.

Learn about more ways to fit in exercise.

Eating Well

Eating a healthy diet is another part of the healthy lifestyle. Not only can a clean diet help with weight management, it can also improve your health and quality of life as you get older. You can use the new MyPlate to determine how many calories you need and what food groups you should focus on or, if you’re looking for smaller changes, you can use these tips for simple ways to change how you eat:

Eat more fruit. Add it to your cereal, your salads or even your dinners

Sneak in more veggies. Add them wherever you can—a tomato on your sandwich, peppers on your pizza, or extra veggies in your pasta sauce. Keep pre-cut or canned/frozen veggies ready for quick snacks.

Switch your salad dressing. If you eat full-fat dressing, switch to something lighter and you’ll automatically eat less calories.

Eat low-fat or fat-free dairy. Switching to skim milk or fat free yogurt is another simple way to eat less calories without having to change too much in your diet.

Make some substitutes. Look through your cabinets or fridge and pick 3 foods you eat every day. Write down the nutritional content and, the next time you’re at the store, find lower-calorie substitutes for just those 3 items.

Find more ideas for healthy foods with this Healthy Foods Grocery List.

Creating a healthy lifestyle doesn’t have to mean drastic changes. In fact, drastic changes almost always lead to failure. Making small changes in how you live each day can lead to big rewards, so figure out what you can to be healthy today.

Home Made Recipes For Natural Beauty

 

1. Home Made Bath Salts for Natural Glow
2. Natural Hair Conditioners and Shampoos
3. Home Made Soaps for Soft and Smooth Skin
4. Natural Facial Masks Recipes
 
 

Get your copy now! 

Home Made Recipes For Natural Beauty


  • 1. Home Made Bath Salts for Natural Glow
  • 2. Natural Hair Conditioners and Shampoos
  • 3. Home Made Soaps for Soft and Smooth Skin
  • 4. Natural Facial Masks Recipes




20 Beauty Secrets Every Teen Should Know



There’s nothing worse than getting advice from older people, we know, we know, but the truth is some advice is worth taking and keeping, especially when it comes to fun beauty tips. We’ve been reading fashion magazines and testing beauty products for years. In this time, we’ve read 1000s of beauty tips, tried 1000s of products, but only a few are worth keeping around. So, here we share with you the 20 things we wish we knew when we were teenagers.
1. Skip the foundation If you have acne the first thing you want to do is slather on the thick foundation. Don’t. Foundation is for women over 35. Not only will it cover up your natural beauty, but foundation on a teenager looks anything but natural. Instead, cover up blemishes with concealer, then follow with a powder or tinted mosturizer. Tinted moisturizers tend to be lighter than heavy foundations. 
2. You pat concealer in, you never rub it in We know this from watching the Tyra Banks show. When applying concealer, put a bit on the pad of your middle finger and pat it in. Never rub. Got acne? Pat the concealer on top of it. 
3. Play up your lips or your eyes, never both If you are wearing heavy eye makeup, go for nude lips with just a bit of gloss. Prefer the drama of dark lipstick? Keep face light (stay away from heavy blush) and wear only mascara on your eyes and a light eyeshadow. Don’t heavily line your eyes. Play up both and you’ll look like a clown.
And never, ever line lips in a darker color than your gloss or lipstick. 
4. Less is more Ever notice how some of your friends look best with no makeup at all? No matter your age, too much makeup makes you look worse. If you wear foundation, powder, blush, liner, mascara, eyeshadow, lip liner and gloss on an everyday basis, then you’re overdoing it. Tone it down: All you really need is a great mascara, concealer for blemishes and gloss. Add a pop of blush in winter. 
5. Natural hair is always hot If you have super dark hair, lighten your look by going a shade darker or getting lighter highlights. Blonde? Try highlights, especially framing the face. We see too many teens lightening their hair several shades and the look can be super-tacky, not super-fabulous. The trick is to let people assume you were born with sun-kissed hair, not that you gave yourself a bad dye job from a bottle. More hair color tips here. 
6. Vaseline is your best friend Vaseline is a great, cheap eye makeup remover. It’s also great for fixing chapped, scaly lips. Slather on a bunch of Vaseline, then use a toothbrush to massage lips. Wipe the excess off on a tissue. Your lips will be smooth and soft. 
7. You can never go wrong with layers Long layers are great for any hair type: Super curly, straight or wavy. It makes thin hair appear thicker, curly hair appear manageable and wavy hair appear just-got-back-from-the-beach sexy. Just make sure you don’t get too many layers cut in. Too many short layers is dated. 
8. Acne? Get thee to a dermatologist, stat Biggest mistake people with acne make? Not going to a dermatologist. Forget those $150 jeans you covet. Getting rid of those pimples will be the best investment you’ll ever make. And the only guaranteed way to do it is with a dermatologist. 
9. Spend money on key beauty products Not sure what to splurge on and what to save on? I give you the scoop in this article. See if you should splurge or save on cleansers, mascara, concealer and more. 
10. Buying foundation or lipstick? Test it first There are some beauty products you simply must try out at a department store or Sephora before you buy. These include: Foundation, lipstick, blush and powder.
Download to Read More

20 Beauty Secrets Every Teen Should Know

There’s nothing worse than getting advice from older people, we know, we know, but the truth is some advice is worth taking and keeping, especially when it comes to fun beauty tips. We’ve been reading fashion magazines and testing beauty products for years. In this time, we’ve read 1000s of beauty tips, tried 1000s of products, but only a few are worth keeping around. So, here we share with you the 20 things we wish we knew when we were teenagers.

1. Skip the foundation If you have acne the first thing you want to do is slather on the thick foundation. Don’t. Foundation is for women over 35. Not only will it cover up your natural beauty, but foundation on a teenager looks anything but natural. Instead, cover up blemishes with concealer, then follow with a powder or tinted mosturizer. Tinted moisturizers tend to be lighter than heavy foundations. 

2. You pat concealer in, you never rub it in We know this from watching the Tyra Banks show. When applying concealer, put a bit on the pad of your middle finger and pat it in. Never rub. Got acne? Pat the concealer on top of it. 

3. Play up your lips or your eyes, never both If you are wearing heavy eye makeup, go for nude lips with just a bit of gloss. Prefer the drama of dark lipstick? Keep face light (stay away from heavy blush) and wear only mascara on your eyes and a light eyeshadow. Don’t heavily line your eyes. Play up both and you’ll look like a clown.

And never, ever line lips in a darker color than your gloss or lipstick. 

4. Less is more Ever notice how some of your friends look best with no makeup at all? No matter your age, too much makeup makes you look worse. If you wear foundation, powder, blush, liner, mascara, eyeshadow, lip liner and gloss on an everyday basis, then you’re overdoing it. Tone it down: All you really need is a great mascara, concealer for blemishes and gloss. Add a pop of blush in winter. 

5. Natural hair is always hot If you have super dark hair, lighten your look by going a shade darker or getting lighter highlights. Blonde? Try highlights, especially framing the face. We see too many teens lightening their hair several shades and the look can be super-tacky, not super-fabulous. The trick is to let people assume you were born with sun-kissed hair, not that you gave yourself a bad dye job from a bottle. More hair color tips here. 

6. Vaseline is your best friend Vaseline is a great, cheap eye makeup remover. It’s also great for fixing chapped, scaly lips. Slather on a bunch of Vaseline, then use a toothbrush to massage lips. Wipe the excess off on a tissue. Your lips will be smooth and soft. 

7. You can never go wrong with layers Long layers are great for any hair type: Super curly, straight or wavy. It makes thin hair appear thicker, curly hair appear manageable and wavy hair appear just-got-back-from-the-beach sexy. Just make sure you don’t get too many layers cut in. Too many short layers is dated. 

8. Acne? Get thee to a dermatologist, stat Biggest mistake people with acne make? Not going to a dermatologist. Forget those $150 jeans you covet. Getting rid of those pimples will be the best investment you’ll ever make. And the only guaranteed way to do it is with a dermatologist. 

9. Spend money on key beauty products Not sure what to splurge on and what to save on? I give you the scoop in this article. See if you should splurge or save on cleansers, mascara, concealer and more. 

10. Buying foundation or lipstick? Test it first There are some beauty products you simply must try out at a department store or Sephora before you buy. These include: Foundation, lipstick, blush and powder.

Download to Read More

WHAT MAKES YOU FEEL BETTER WHEN YOU ARE IN A BAD MOOD?

Pausing for a minute while closed eyes.. taking deep breathe and releasing away negative thoughts in my mind.. and at the last seconds, before i open my eyes, ill say to my self and smile.. ” All izz well” “_-)

PAIN RELIEVER
]]>What is tramadol?
Tramadol is a narcotic-like pain reliever.
Tramadol is used to treat moderate to severe pain. Tramadol extended-release is used to treat moderate to severe chronic pain when treatment is needed around the clock.
Tramadol may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.
Important information about tramadol
You should not take this medication if you are allergic to tramadol, if you have ever been addicted to drugs or alcohol, or if you have ever attempted suicide. Do not take tramadol while you are intoxicated (drunk) or taking any of the following: alcohol or street drugs, narcotic pain medicine, sedatives or tranquilizers, or medicine for depression, anxiety, or mental illness.
Seizures (convulsions) have occurred in some people taking this medicine. Tramadol may be more likely to cause a seizure if you have a history of seizures or head injury, a metabolic disorder, or if you are taking certain medicines such as antidepressants, muscle relaxers, narcotic, or medicine for nausea and vomiting.
Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. A tramadol overdose can be fatal.
Tramadol may be habit-forming and should be used only by the person it was prescribed for. Keep the medication in a secure place where others cannot get to it.
Do not crush the tramadol tablet. This medicine is for oral (by mouth) use only. Powder from a crushed tablet should not be inhaled or diluted with liquid and injected into the body. Using this medicine by inhalation or injection can cause life-threatening side effects, overdose, or death.
Before taking tramadol
You should not take this medication if you are allergic to tramadol, if you have ever been addicted to drugs or alcohol, or if you have ever attempted suicide.
Do not take tramadol while you are intoxicated (drunk) or taking any of the following:

alcohol or street drugs;


narcotic pain medicine;


sedatives or tranquilizers (such as Valium);


medicine for depression or anxiety; or


medicine for mental illness (such as bipolar disorder, schizophrenia).

Seizures have occurred in some people taking tramadol. Talk with your doctor about your seizure risk, which may be higher if you have:

a history of drug or alcohol addiction;


a history of epilepsy or other seizure disorder;


a history of head injury;


a metabolic disorder; or


if you are also taking an antidepressant, muscle relaxer, narcotic, antipsychotic, or medicine for nausea and vomiting.

To make sure you can safely take tramadol, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

kidney disease (or if you are on dialysis);


cirrhosis or other liver disease;


a stomach disorder; or


a history of depression, mental illness, or thoughts of suicide.

Tramadol may be habit forming and should be used only by the person it was prescribed for. Never share tramadol with another person, especially someone with a history of drug abuse or addiction. Keep the medication in a place where others cannot get to it.
FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether tramadol will harm an unborn baby. Tramadol may cause serious or fatal side effects in a newborn if the mother uses this medication during pregnancy or labor. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medication. Tramadol can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. You should not breast-feed while you are taking tramadol. Do not give this medication to anyone younger than 16 years old without the advice of a doctor.

PAIN RELIEVER

What is tramadol?

Tramadol is a narcotic-like pain reliever.

Tramadol is used to treat moderate to severe pain. Tramadol extended-release is used to treat moderate to severe chronic pain when treatment is needed around the clock.

Tramadol may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

Important information about tramadol

You should not take this medication if you are allergic to tramadol, if you have ever been addicted to drugs or alcohol, or if you have ever attempted suicide. Do not take tramadol while you are intoxicated (drunk) or taking any of the following: alcohol or street drugs, narcotic pain medicine, sedatives or tranquilizers, or medicine for depression, anxiety, or mental illness.

Seizures (convulsions) have occurred in some people taking this medicine. Tramadol may be more likely to cause a seizure if you have a history of seizures or head injury, a metabolic disorder, or if you are taking certain medicines such as antidepressants, muscle relaxers, narcotic, or medicine for nausea and vomiting.

Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. A tramadol overdose can be fatal.

Tramadol may be habit-forming and should be used only by the person it was prescribed for. Keep the medication in a secure place where others cannot get to it.

Do not crush the tramadol tablet. This medicine is for oral (by mouth) use only. Powder from a crushed tablet should not be inhaled or diluted with liquid and injected into the body. Using this medicine by inhalation or injection can cause life-threatening side effects, overdose, or death.

Before taking tramadol

You should not take this medication if you are allergic to tramadol, if you have ever been addicted to drugs or alcohol, or if you have ever attempted suicide.

Do not take tramadol while you are intoxicated (drunk) or taking any of the following:

  • alcohol or street drugs;

  • narcotic pain medicine;

  • sedatives or tranquilizers (such as Valium);

  • medicine for depression or anxiety; or

  • medicine for mental illness (such as bipolar disorder, schizophrenia).

Seizures have occurred in some people taking tramadol. Talk with your doctor about your seizure risk, which may be higher if you have:

  • a history of drug or alcohol addiction;

  • a history of epilepsy or other seizure disorder;

  • a history of head injury;

  • a metabolic disorder; or

  • if you are also taking an antidepressant, muscle relaxer, narcotic, antipsychotic, or medicine for nausea and vomiting.

To make sure you can safely take tramadol, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

  • kidney disease (or if you are on dialysis);

  • cirrhosis or other liver disease;

  • a stomach disorder; or

  • a history of depression, mental illness, or thoughts of suicide.

Tramadol may be habit forming and should be used only by the person it was prescribed for. Never share tramadol with another person, especially someone with a history of drug abuse or addiction. Keep the medication in a place where others cannot get to it.

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether tramadol will harm an unborn baby. Tramadol may cause serious or fatal side effects in a newborn if the mother uses this medication during pregnancy or labor. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medication. Tramadol can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. You should not breast-feed while you are taking tramadol. Do not give this medication to anyone younger than 16 years old without the advice of a doctor.

What is Retin-A?
Retin-A (tretinoin) is a topical (applied to the skin) form of vitamin A that helps the skin renew itself.
The Retin-A and Avita brands of tretinoin are used to treat acne. The Renova brand of tretinoin is used to reduce the appearance of fine wrinkles and mottled skin discoloration, and to make rough facial skin feel smoother.
Retin-A may also be used for purposes other than those listed here.
Important information about Retin-A
When using Retin-A avoid exposure to sunlight or artificial UV rays (sunlamps or tanning beds). Retin-A can make your skin more sensitive to sunlight and sunburn may result. Use a sunscreen (minimum SPF 15) and wear protective clothing if you must be out in the sun. Avoid getting Retin-A in your eyes, mouth, and nose, or on your lips. If it does get into any of these areas, wash with water. Do not use Retin-A on sunburned, windburned, dry, chapped, irritated, or broken skin. Also avoid using this medication in wounds or on areas of eczema. Wait until these conditions have healed before using Retin-A.
Use this medication for as many days as it has been prescribed for you even if you think it is not working. It may take weeks or months of use before you notice improvement in your skin. If you are using Retin-A to treat acne, your condition may get slightly worse for a short time when you first start using the medication. Call your doctor if skin irritation becomes severe or if your acne does not improve within 8 to 12 weeks.
Before using Retin-A
FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether Retin A is harmful to an unborn baby. Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. Tretinoin topical can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Do not use Retin A without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.
How should I use Retin-A?
Use Retin-A exactly as your doctor has prescribed it for you. Using more medicine or applying it more often than prescribed will not make it work any faster, and may increase side effects. Do not use Retin-A for longer than your doctor has prescribed.
Wash your hands before and after applying Retin-A. Before applying, clean and dry the skin area to be treated.
Applying Retin-A to wet skin may cause skin irritation. If you use Renova, wait at least 20 minutes after washing your face before applying a thin layer of the medication.
Do not wash the treated area for at least 1 hour after applying Retin-A. Avoid the use of other skin products on the treated area for at least 1 hour following application of Retin-A.
Applying an excessive amount of Retin-A gel may result in “pilling” of the medication. If this occurs, use a thinner layer of gel with the next application.
Retin-A should be used as part of a complete skin care program that includes avoiding sunlight and using an effective sunscreen and protective clothing.
Use Retin-A for as many days as it has been prescribed for you even if you think it is not working. It may take weeks or months of use before you notice improvement in your skin. If you are using Retin-A to treat acne, your condition may get slightly worse for a short time when you first start using the medication. Call your doctor if skin irritation becomes severe or if your acne does not improve within 8 to 12 weeks.
Store this medication at room temperature away from moisture and heat. The gel formulations of Retin-A are flammable, keep them away from open flame.
What happens if I miss a dose?
Use the medication as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and wait until your next regularly scheduled dose. Do not apply extra medicine to make up the missed dose.
What happens if I overdose?
Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. Retin-A is not expected to cause overdose symptoms.
What should I avoid while using Retin-A?
Avoid exposure to sunlight or artificial UV rays (sunlamps or tanning beds). Retin-A can make your skin more sensitive to sunlight and sunburn may result. Use a sunscreen (minimum SPF 15) and wear protective clothing if you must be out in the sun. Avoid getting Retin-A in your eyes, mouth, and nose, or on your lips. If it does get into any of these areas, wash with water. Do not use Retin-A on skin that is sunburned, windburned, dry, chapped, or irritated. Also avoid using this medicine in wounds or on areas of eczema. Wait until these conditions have healed before using Retin-A.
Avoid using skin products that can cause irritation, such as harsh soaps, shampoos, or skin cleansers, hair coloring or permanent chemicals, hair removers or waxes, or skin products with alcohol, spices, astringents, or lime. Do not use other medication skin products unless your doctor has told you to.
Your skin may be more sensitive to weather extremes such as cold and wind while using this medicine.
Retin-A Side Effects
Stop using this medication and get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction to Retin-A: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.
Less serious Retin-A side effects may include burning, warmth, stinging, tingling, itching, redness, swelling, dryness, peeling, irritation, or discolored skin.
This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.
What other drugs will affect Retin-A?
Do not use skin products that contain benzoyl peroxide, sulfur, resorcinol, or salicylic acid unless otherwise directed by your doctor. These products can cause severe skin irritation if used with Retin-A.
The following drugs can interact with Retin-A, which can make your skin more sensitive to natural and artificial sunlight. Before using Retin-A, tell your doctor if you are using any of these:

a diuretic (water pill);


tetracycline (Sumycin, Panmycin, Robitet), minocycline (Minocin), doxycycline (Doryx, Vibramycin), demeclocycline (Declomycin), and others;


an antibiotic such as ciprofloxacin (Cipro), ofloxacin (Floxin), and others;


a sulfa drug such as Bactrim, Septra, Cotrim, and others; or


chlorpromazine (Thorazine), prochlorperazine (Compazine), fluphenazine (Permitil, Prolixin), promethazine (Phenergan, Promethegan), perphenazine (Trilafon), and others.

This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can affect Retin-A. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.

What is Retin-A?

Retin-A (tretinoin) is a topical (applied to the skin) form of vitamin A that helps the skin renew itself.

The Retin-A and Avita brands of tretinoin are used to treat acne. The Renova brand of tretinoin is used to reduce the appearance of fine wrinkles and mottled skin discoloration, and to make rough facial skin feel smoother.

Retin-A may also be used for purposes other than those listed here.

Important information about Retin-A

When using Retin-A avoid exposure to sunlight or artificial UV rays (sunlamps or tanning beds). Retin-A can make your skin more sensitive to sunlight and sunburn may result. Use a sunscreen (minimum SPF 15) and wear protective clothing if you must be out in the sun. Avoid getting Retin-A in your eyes, mouth, and nose, or on your lips. If it does get into any of these areas, wash with water. Do not use Retin-A on sunburned, windburned, dry, chapped, irritated, or broken skin. Also avoid using this medication in wounds or on areas of eczema. Wait until these conditions have healed before using Retin-A.

Use this medication for as many days as it has been prescribed for you even if you think it is not working. It may take weeks or months of use before you notice improvement in your skin. If you are using Retin-A to treat acne, your condition may get slightly worse for a short time when you first start using the medication. Call your doctor if skin irritation becomes severe or if your acne does not improve within 8 to 12 weeks.

Before using Retin-A

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether Retin A is harmful to an unborn baby. Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. Tretinoin topical can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Do not use Retin A without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

How should I use Retin-A?

Use Retin-A exactly as your doctor has prescribed it for you. Using more medicine or applying it more often than prescribed will not make it work any faster, and may increase side effects. Do not use Retin-A for longer than your doctor has prescribed.

Wash your hands before and after applying Retin-A. Before applying, clean and dry the skin area to be treated.

Applying Retin-A to wet skin may cause skin irritation. If you use Renova, wait at least 20 minutes after washing your face before applying a thin layer of the medication.

Do not wash the treated area for at least 1 hour after applying Retin-A. Avoid the use of other skin products on the treated area for at least 1 hour following application of Retin-A.

Applying an excessive amount of Retin-A gel may result in “pilling” of the medication. If this occurs, use a thinner layer of gel with the next application.

Retin-A should be used as part of a complete skin care program that includes avoiding sunlight and using an effective sunscreen and protective clothing.

Use Retin-A for as many days as it has been prescribed for you even if you think it is not working. It may take weeks or months of use before you notice improvement in your skin. If you are using Retin-A to treat acne, your condition may get slightly worse for a short time when you first start using the medication. Call your doctor if skin irritation becomes severe or if your acne does not improve within 8 to 12 weeks.

Store this medication at room temperature away from moisture and heat. The gel formulations of Retin-A are flammable, keep them away from open flame.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Use the medication as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and wait until your next regularly scheduled dose. Do not apply extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. Retin-A is not expected to cause overdose symptoms.

What should I avoid while using Retin-A?

Avoid exposure to sunlight or artificial UV rays (sunlamps or tanning beds). Retin-A can make your skin more sensitive to sunlight and sunburn may result. Use a sunscreen (minimum SPF 15) and wear protective clothing if you must be out in the sun. Avoid getting Retin-A in your eyes, mouth, and nose, or on your lips. If it does get into any of these areas, wash with water. Do not use Retin-A on skin that is sunburned, windburned, dry, chapped, or irritated. Also avoid using this medicine in wounds or on areas of eczema. Wait until these conditions have healed before using Retin-A.

Avoid using skin products that can cause irritation, such as harsh soaps, shampoos, or skin cleansers, hair coloring or permanent chemicals, hair removers or waxes, or skin products with alcohol, spices, astringents, or lime. Do not use other medication skin products unless your doctor has told you to.

Your skin may be more sensitive to weather extremes such as cold and wind while using this medicine.

Retin-A Side Effects

Stop using this medication and get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction to Retin-A: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Less serious Retin-A side effects may include burning, warmth, stinging, tingling, itching, redness, swelling, dryness, peeling, irritation, or discolored skin.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Retin-A?

Do not use skin products that contain benzoyl peroxide, sulfur, resorcinol, or salicylic acid unless otherwise directed by your doctor. These products can cause severe skin irritation if used with Retin-A.

The following drugs can interact with Retin-A, which can make your skin more sensitive to natural and artificial sunlight. Before using Retin-A, tell your doctor if you are using any of these:

  • a diuretic (water pill);

  • tetracycline (Sumycin, Panmycin, Robitet), minocycline (Minocin), doxycycline (Doryx, Vibramycin), demeclocycline (Declomycin), and others;

  • an antibiotic such as ciprofloxacin (Cipro), ofloxacin (Floxin), and others;

  • a sulfa drug such as Bactrim, Septra, Cotrim, and others; or

  • chlorpromazine (Thorazine), prochlorperazine (Compazine), fluphenazine (Permitil, Prolixin), promethazine (Phenergan, Promethegan), perphenazine (Trilafon), and others.

This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can affect Retin-A. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.

Below are the list of different medicine for maintaining a healthy living. It will guide you on how to use it and know the benifits of taking it.

ANTI DEPRESSANTS PRODUCTS


SKIN CARE


WEIGHT LOSS


MUSCLE RELAXANT


WOMEN'S HEALTH


MEN'S HEALTH


PAIN RELIEVER


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